Celebrate the LGBTQ+ Community and Join Us in the 2022 San Francisco Pride Parade

Celebrate the LGBTQ+ Community and Join Us in the 2022 San Francisco Pride Parade

It’s June–school is out, summer is in full-swing—and across the nation all month long we acknowledge, honor, and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community with Pride awareness, advocacy, and events.

This year, LightHouse is honored to, once again, extend an invitation to all LGBTQ+ community members, their families, friends, and allies as we march in the 52nd annual Pride Parade in San Francisco on Sunday, June 26. We will proudly commemorate LGBTQ+ heritage as well as raise awareness for the needs of LGBTQ+ people with disabilities. Join us in marching side-by-side or come to the LightHouse headquarters at 1155 Market Street to watch a live stream of the parade with audio description. Once the parade is over, and our contingency arrives at LightHouse, we will commence the Pride After-Party, serving snacks and refreshments. This is a celebration you won’t want to miss!

The celebration runs from Sunday, June 26, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Registration for the LightHouse Pride celebration will be required for all participants, whether they want to walk the parade route or watch from our LightHouse Headquarters at 1155 Market Street. There will also be opportunities for those who wish to volunteer. We will host a live stream of the parade, complete with an audio description. When our contingent finishes marching the parade and arrives at LightHouse, we will commence the Pride after-party, offering light snacks and refreshments. This is a celebration not to be missed!

The San Francisco Lighthouse is proud to provide visual interpreting services for the San Francisco Pride Parade in partnership with Aira. Aira will be describing the televised coverage of the parade from ABC affiliate, KGO Channel 7. Aira will not provide video coverage, but you may watch the video of the parade on one device and listen to audio description from Aira on a separate device. Here’s how:

Watching the Parade

The San Francisco Pride Parade will air on Bay Area station ABC 7 (KGO). It will also be streamed at abc7news.com/Pride.

Audio Description from Aira 

The San Francisco Lighthouse is proud to provide visual interpreting services for the San Francisco Pride Parade in partnership with Aira. Aira will be describing the televised coverage of the parade from ABC affiliate, KGO Channel 7. Aira will not provide video coverage, but you may watch the video of the parade on one device and listen to audio description from Aira on a separate device. Here’s how:

Via YouTube

You can listen to the coverage on Aira’s YouTube channel. If you subscribe to the channel, you will be notified when the live stream begins.
 

Via Zoom

We will provide a Zoom Webinar for those wishing to use the Zoom platform. Go to bit.ly/airapride to join the webinar.
 
You can also listen by phone via Zoom at one of these numbers. For higher quality, dial a number based on your current location:
 
In the United States:
+1 312 626 6799 or
+1 646 876 9923 or
+1 301 715 8592 or
+1 346 248 7799 or
+1 669 900 6833 or
+1 253 215 8782
Webinar ID: 842 2939 6670
International numbers available: https://aira.zoom.us/u/kciAr2e0Nl

Accessibility for those Marching in the Parade

The parade route is 1.8 miles long and will involve standing and walking. We will have limited ways for seated options to participate in the parade. If you’d like to request a wheeled ride during the parade, please indicate this in the comments at the end of the registration form.
 
You may also request a human guide to march in the parade.

LightHouse Pride T-Shirts

The first 50 people to register for the LightHouse Pride celebration, whether marching in the parade or watching from our headquarters, will receive a free LightHouse Pride t-shirt. You may also purchase a LightHouse 2022 Pride t-shirt online at Adaptations.org. Our fabulous Pride t-shirt was designed in-house and sports a stylish and unique way to bring awareness to blind, low vision, and DeafBlind LGBTQ+ community members. The shirt is white and features a pair of sunglasses with the rainbow Pride flag reflecting in the lenses. A white cane leans on the left side of the sunglasses’ frame. Underneath the glasses it says “Be Seen” in black print with “be seen” in orange Braille dots beneath. On the back of the t-shirt is the LightHouse logo with “LightHouse” in uncontracted rainbow-colored Braille beneath the logo. T-shirts are available in sizes S-XL for $30.00, size 2XL for $33.25, and size 3XL for $34.50.

For more information about the San Francisco Pride 2022 event, please contact Sheri Albers, Community Outreach Coordinator, at SAlbers@lighthouse-sf.org or call 415-694-7331.

Register for the LightHouse San Francisco Pride Parade celebration.

Order Your Pride t-Shirt online from Adaptations.org.

 

From Low Tech to Access Tech: How Sean Dougherty Got on Board with Access Technology

From Low Tech to Access Tech: How Sean Dougherty Got on Board with Access Technology

While our physical doors were closed for twenty-six months, we continued to provide tons of virtual programs and to expand services, that meant hiring new employees. One of the employees who joined us during that time is Access Technology Specialist Sean Dougherty.
 
Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, Sean has Cone Dystrophy, a genetic condition which causes a high degree of light sensitivity. Sean has low vision and, while he’s been a lifelong user of access technology, he admits that he wasn’t always comfortable using it.
 
“When I was younger, although I had challenges with reading the board in the classroom, I would kind of ‘get by’ by doing things like using high contrast mode on my computer and pasting text into Word and making it bigger. I would hide my use of access technology. People knew about my eye condition, but I wasn’t open about it. A lot of tools were presented to me at that time like text-to-speech, but I was pretty resistant to trying them due to a fear of standing out.”
 
Sean went on to study liberal arts with a focus in History at the University of Michigan for undergrad. After that, he started his career at a nonprofit he founded with his dad, called Education at Work.

“It was a company that hired college students to do customer support work for other companies in the tech and financial industries. We were able to pay those college students a wage, plus as a nonprofit we were able to pay them tax-free tuition assistance, too. Our whole mission was around reducing student loan debt and helping students gain entry level job skills and, then, when they went to graduate, we would try to place them into full time jobs with our clients.”
 
Sean was still not comfortable with his blindness, but he attended and volunteered at ReelAbilities, a national disability film festival, which was a turning point for him.
 
“Through that, I met some amazing people—like a Supreme Court Justice from the state of Michigan who’s completely blind. Just meeting people like that pushed me. It was exciting to see what people in our community were doing.”

After Education at Work was sold to a larger nonprofit in 2017, Sean went to work on the education team at Google, which is what brought him from Ohio to the San Francisco Bay Area. It was at Google that he really started using accessible technology in earnest.
 
“As I got more into the workforce, I realized I wanted to increase my productivity. When I got to Google, they were a very open and accepting organization. So, when I first started there, I was very transparent about telling them the condition I had. I realized that access technology was a different way of doing things to reach the same end goal.”
 
At Google, Sean’s focus was working on technology partnerships and co-marketing with education technology software and hardware developers. He also met Laura Allen, who works on the accessibility team at Google and is a LightHouse board member. Sean got to work with Laura on several accessibility-focused projects at Google.
 
“There was a lot of overlap between accessibility and education at Google. I really loved working in education, but I really wanted to make the transition into accessibility and access technology.”

In August 2021, Sean joined LightHouse as an Access Technology Specialist, and one of his main roles is teaching students. Asked what he would say to someone who wants to know why access technology is important, Sean said:
 
“I always try to focus on their goals and work backwards from there. I might say, ‘Okay, you know you want to get a new job, or you want to go back to school. So, what do you need to learn to do that successfully?’“
 
Sean’s work also includes accessibility testing of websites and apps. He highlighted one service in particular:
 
“One thing we offer is an accessibility walkthrough. The accessibility walkthrough is essentially where we’ll schedule a time with that client, and actually walk through their website or app with them. We’ll show them how it works with a screen reader and magnification tools. It’s helpful for them to understand the user experience of someone who utilizes a screen reader or magnification to navigate their website or app. Even if the code is meeting the accessibility guidelines, there might still be usability issues and it’s incredibly important to test the product with users from our community.”

Sean is continuing to learn more about Access Technology by completing his master’s degree online in Assistive Technology and Human Services at California State University Northridge.
 
And now, a couple of fun facts about Sean:
 
“I wear very dark sunglasses. I’m always looking for the darkest lenses I can find, and I found some lenses made for ice climbing that are incredible.” The brand Sean wears is Julbos.
 
In his free time, Sean enjoys traveling, tasting new foods, and outdoor adventures through activities like snow skiing, skateboarding, hiking and biking.
 
If you are interested in finding out about Access Technology services at LightHouse, visit the LightHouse Access Technology webpage. To sign up for access technology training, contact at@lighthouse-sf.org. For design consulting and user testing services, contact Jeffrey Colon at JColon@lighthouse-sf.org.

Free Tickets to Enjoy an Audio Described Contemporary Ballet Performance

Free Tickets to Enjoy an Audio Described Contemporary Ballet Performance

By Maia Scott, Adult Programs Coordinator

Ballet and dance are all about the language of movement. Describing that movement so that it is accessible to people who are blind or have low vision is part of the mission of Gravity Access Services. They are an organization which makes live performances accessible to people with disabilities.
 
We’re pleased to offer free tickets to a performance of SKETCH 12: Dear Diary by the contemporary ballet company Amy Seiwert’s Imagery on Saturday, July 16 at 7:30 pm at the Cowell Theater, at Fort Mason Center for the Arts in San Francisco. There will be a preshow haptic tour onstage prior to the performance, close-up seating and the use of ten audio description headsets to enjoy a night of dance.
 
LightHouse students are welcome to come with a guest. 

Managing Director, Annika Presley, who reached out to the LightHouse with this opportunity, shared that accessibility is very important to her. She has worked as Education Director for Axis Dance Company, teaching classes within the disability community.
 
SKETCH 12: Dear Diary presents three innovative new dance works exploring the bittersweet complexity of nostalgia. During a highly collaborative five-week laboratory, choreographers Amy Seiwert, Natasha Adorlee and Joshua L. Peugh, created new ballet-based work while participating in a “crit group”, a creative feedback process rare in ballet settings. The result is three bold new works that welcome the choreographers and dance artists to take risks, shed old habits and consider new perspectives.
 
What: Amy Seiwert’s Imagery, a contemporary ballet company presents SKETCH 12: Dear Diary
When: Saturday, July 16, 2022, at 7:30 pm |Haptic Access Tour prior to the show at 6:00 pm
Where: Cowell Theater at Fort Mason Center for the Arts, 2 Marina Blvd, San Francisco, CA 94123
RSVP: Maia Scott at MScott@lighthouse-sf.org or 415-694-7608.

A Ride to Remember

A Ride to Remember

Recently LightHouse CEO, Bryan Bashin, and Community Outreach Coordinator, Sheri Albers, took a ride with Waymo to experience fully autonomous driving technology. Waymo has sponsored the LightHouse Holman Prize for Blind Ambition for the past two years and we have also worked together on accessibility testing. So when Waymo invited them to take part in a journey in an autonomous vehicle, they did not have to ask twice.
 
Their ride was caught on camera and below is part of the blog Waymo has written about the experience.

Watch the video of the ride with audio description and check out Waymo’s blog post and find out more about Bryan and Sheri’s ride.

Autonomous Vehicles Represent a New Form of Independence for People Who Are Blind
 
Like so many other people who have had the chance to go to college, Bryan Bashin’s experience transformed his life. For many people, it’s about learning to see the world in a new light. For Bashin, it was about learning how to live in the world without being able to see.

 
Bryan has been blind since he was a teenager, but confidently navigating the world wasn’t something he initially knew how to do.
 
“Like so many blind people, I didn’t know how to be blind,” Bryan shared. That all changed as he attended college, entered his twenties, and met other blind people who were boldly creating the lives they wanted.
 
“Part of my growth was to find blind people who were just living life and living the way they wanted to, going where they wanted, doing what they wanted to do,” Bryan said.
 
Now, as CEO of LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired in San Francisco, Bryan makes it his mission to equip others to find the same sense of independence and freedom that he found.
 
“My purpose is to make sure that other blind people who are newly blind or just learning to deal with blindness, have the same opportunities so that they can have the life they want,” Bryan said.
 
Sheri Albers, Community Outreach Coordinator for LightHouse, said she now has her dream job telling people in the Bay Area about LightHouse and the support and resources available to them. 
 
“I grew up with an eye disease that was degenerative, losing my vision slowly over my life, but I didn’t have any services,” Sheri said. “I kind of struggled and fended for myself.”

Now, in her job at LightHouse, Sheri gets to go out into the community and help connect people with resources.
 
“In a way, it’s me telling my story about what I did not have as a blind person growing up, and what they have at their fingertips with LightHouse, so to speak,” Sheri said. Sheri’s new mantra is “Where has LightHouse been all my life?”
 
Sheri said that for people experiencing vision loss later in life, losing the ability to drive can be devastating. Without training and mentorship a newly-blind person may often be understandably overwhelmed at first. “The depression of that, and the realization of the potential loss of the independence from that, sets in,” Sheri explained.
 
Sheri emphasized that, for people who are blind, the ability to easily and conveniently go from point A to point B is fundamentally about mobility equity.

“Every day, a hundred million Americans get in cars when they want, go where they want to go, do it by themselves, and have that tranquility,” Sheri said, adding that most sighted people are not refused entrance to ride-hailing vehicles because they have a guide dog or asked insulting questions about how they became blind. “Those hundred million Americans are just living their lives,” said Sheri. “We want that too.”
 
To that end, LightHouse has joined the Waymo-led public education campaign, Let’s Talk Autonomous Driving, a partnership dedicated to fostering conversation and raising awareness about how fully autonomous driving technology could offer a safe mobility option to connect people and communities.
 
“So the chance to have autonomy in vehicles is a means to get us to where we want to go, which is living in the world, being part of the world,” Bryan emphasized. “It’s not just about going to a place; it’s about having possession of your own life.”
 
For people who are blind, fully autonomous driving technology represents a new way to get around without depending on anyone else, going wherever they want to go, at whatever time they choose.
 
Bryan and Sheri recently took a ride with Waymo to experience fully autonomous driving technology for themselves.

Waymo has been operating the Trusted Tester Program, offering autonomous rides, with autonomous specialists behind the wheel, to riders in San Francisco and recently began offering fully autonomous rides, with no human driver behind the wheel, to its San Francisco employees.
 
As Bryan and Sheri settled into the Waymo vehicle, Bryan asked Sheri if she was ready to begin the ride. She nodded ‘yes.’
 
“Here we go,” Bryan said as he pressed the Start button to begin the ride.
 
Bryan and Sheri were immediately impressed by how the car confidently began the trip.
 
“There was no hesitation at all,” Sheri said. 
 
After their ride, Bryan and Sheri reflected on the significance of what they had just experienced.

“You could feel a zillion sensors in that machine just noticing everything. It was cautious, but it felt like a machine that was super aware,” Bryan said.

Sheri said the ride represented the beautiful freedom, independence and autonomy of being able to go wherever she chooses.
 
“To have been able to experience the exhilaration of riding in an autonomous vehicle today as blind people, oh my goodness, I mean, it is just inexplicable joy,” Sheri said. 
 
Bryan said that, for people who are blind, advocating for and embracing innovative new ways to have freedom and autonomy has been part of playing an active role in shaping their own destinies.

A Braille Tip to Get Your Fingers Itching to Learn

A Braille Tip to Get Your Fingers Itching to Learn

Did you know that less than 10% of the 1.3 million residents of the United States who are blind or have low vision are Braille readers? One reason for this is the common misconception that Braille is difficult to learn. Not at the LightHouse! We are setting out to put a stop to this rumor. Here is a helpful tip from Divina Carlson, Braille instructor and tactile reader extraordinaire:
 
“If you learn letters ‘a through j’ in Braille, you also learn the numbers ‘0 through 9’. Imagine, learning the first ten letters of the alphabet in Braille will allow you to access the Braille numbers on the elevator buttons, room signage, Braille playing cards and more! In the short time it takes you to learn the first ten letters of the alphabet, you can now access every combination of numbers in the world.”
 
Want to find out exactly how Braille works? Visit the LightHouse website, or contact Divina Carlson at Brailletraining@lighthouse-sf.org. Sign up for lessons today and learn just how valuable (and easy!) Braille truly is. For more Braille tips and tricks, follow LightHouse on FacebookTwitter and Instagram .

Mount Veder Echoes with the Sound of a Beating Drum as the First DeafBlind Camp since 2019 is Held at EHC

Mount Veder Echoes with the Sound of a Beating Drum as the First DeafBlind Camp since 2019 is Held at EHC

Last week, 19 DeafBlind campers converged on Enchanted Hills Camp (EHC) in Napa for the first time in three years. DeafBlind people as a group across the world have experienced a different, and arguably more complete form of isolation than many during the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of the necessary masking and social distancing, a group who relies on touch and proximity to people, to communicate through tactile signing onto hands, lost that connection. The DeafBlind Community was forced to, where possible, adopt and adapt other means of communication, like using phones connected to the internet with attached refreshable braille as their main method of two-way communication. This reduced interaction to a bare minimum. Only being able to interact at a distance or with technologically imposed time delays can be incredibly frustrating.
 
This is why we kicked off the 2022 EHC summer season by inviting this group to be the first to travel to Napa this year to revel in the chance to reconnect and be together, while breathing in the fresh air and enjoying the touch of nature on hands and feet.

COVID-19 safety guidelines were assiduously followed, with all staff, volunteers, and campers required to show proof of vaccination and a negative COVID test before coming to camp. Indoor masking, except when sleeping or eating, was also observed. A talented group of Support Service Providers took part as guides and activity facilitators.
 
The focus for this cohort of adults of a wide range of ages was to socialize and be in the company of other DeafBlind people. An array of activities was available to create that special feeling of achieving, making, or building something as a collective.
 
Campers did paddle-boating, archery, and hiked the trails. There were arts and crafts for the creatives among the group: painters painted while others built wooden birdhouses. Bingo cards in large print and Braille were there for those who like a bit of friendly competition.

The hands-down favorite activity appears to have been musical chairs. Along with the campers, our distant EHC Napa neighbors may have also enjoyed the strong beat of a resonant bass drum that all campers could feel vibrating through their beings. When the beat stopped, campers scrambled for a seat.
 
We hope our DeafBlind campers had a great time and are catching up on their sleep! There’s no rest and not much breathing space for EHC staff as they busily prepare for the next excited group. The newest members of our LightHouse community, the students of our brand new LightHouse Little Learners Program and their families, are taking over the cabins and the trails at EHC only a few days after this group. We wish them a welcome and magical experience.

Visit Adaptations in the Exhibit Hall at ACB, NFB Conventions

Visit Adaptations in the Exhibit Hall at ACB, NFB Conventions

Editor’s Note: Last week, we told you that our MAD Lab will be at the ACB and NFB conventions. Now, find out more about the offerings from Adaptations, our blindness products store, at both.  
 
By Raqi Gomez, Adaptations Store Manager
 
Adaptations will be selling custom TMAPs on-demand at the American Council of the Blind (ACB) and the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) summer conventions. Stop by booth 20 at the ACB Convention on Sunday, July 3 or Monday, July 4 in Omaha, Nebraska, or visit us on Wednesday, July 6 and Thursday, July 7 at the NFB convention taking place in New Orleans, Louisiana. You’ll be able to purchase your own custom, Braille TMAP at a special convention rate

We will also feature several popular items produced at the LightHouse, including unique greeting cards for all occasions, Unified English Braille contractions bookletsBraille and tactile intersection guides, and other miscellaneous Braille offerings like our Lord of the Rings Middle Earth Map Bundle and Apple Swift Playgrounds containing Braille and tactile graphics. 
 
Stop by for more information, or to learn what’s new at LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired in San Francisco. We look forward to meeting you!
 
Adaptations is now open for in-person shopping by appointment. Call 888-400-8933 or email adaptations@lighthouse-sf.org to schedule yours today. You can also purchase products online at Adaptations.org.

Meet Sabrina Bolus: A New member of our Community Services Team

Meet Sabrina Bolus: A New member of our Community Services Team

Earlier this year, Sabrina Bolus joined LightHouse as one of our new Adult Programs Coordinators. So far, Sabrina and co-coordinator, Maia Scott, have hit the ground running, creating many new programs and building community for our LightHouse students 18 years and older. We asked Sabrina some questions to get to know her a little better.
 
What type of work did you do before joining LightHouse?
“For 15 years, I was able to develop creative marketing programs for the tech Industry. Among other things, I translated technical information into everyday language through songs and scripted performances at trade shows and other events. In 2014, I graduated from seminary, where I learned to listen with my heart. I spent 1600 hours in clinical training and got to do 400 of them in Ghana, Africa. Visiting the land of my ancestors was a dream come true. I became an interfaith chaplain who worked in recovery and got to walk with people as they reconnected with themselves and others. From this experience, I try not to stay stuck in a problem. I give it space, then live in the solution. I got to teach this for the better part of the last seven years.”

As a person who has low vision, how do you think your own experiences have shaped you?
“My vision journey has been like changing high school in my senior year. I sometimes feel lost and out of place and need new ways to do things. There are times that I am sad or angry about my vision changes. At times, I am afraid. So, I learned to use the energy of fear to my advantage. I became curious about it all, and I paid attention to how things felt and eventually learned to grow and have fun again. As my vision changed, I received great support from the Oakland Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and my current support group, recommended by UC Berkely Low Vision Clinic. I learn and grow by staying connected with others.”
 
What are you most looking forward to in your new role as Adult Programs Co-Coordinator?
“Now that I finally know what makes me feel whole, I can set an intention for it. After three years of working from home, I am learning how to be in a community again. I am being connected to people, which is why I appreciate working as an Adult Programs Coordinator in the Community Services Department at the LightHouse. I get to support and co-create programs that re-connect people to joyfulness and to others.”

We are delighted to welcome Sabrina to our staff and cannot wait to see how her previous life and career experiences and her valuable insight and positive outlook will shape the blind and low vision community. Please feel free to reach out to her at SBolus@lighthouse-sf.org.
 
You can join Sabrina and Maia at any one of our new programs or events for adult students. Check out the LightHouse Calendar to view all our programs and events.

Meet with MAD Lab at the Summer 2022 Blind Consumer Conventions

Meet with MAD Lab at the Summer 2022 Blind Consumer Conventions

Members of our Media and Accessible Design Laboratory (MAD Lab) team will be on hand at the LightHouse exhibit booths at this summer’s American Council of the Blind (ACB) and National Federation of the Blind (NFB) conventions. They’ll be showcasing our famous TMAP, which is a tactile street map of a specific area or location as designated by the end-user. Frank Welte will be representing the MAD Lab at the ACB convention in Omaha, Nebraska and at the NFB convention in New Orleans, Louisiana.

If you’re going to the ACB convention, stop by our exhibit booth, say hi to Frank and take a look at a tactile map of Omaha.

Those of you going to New Orleans will find it a bit easier to explore the city because NFB and MAD Lab are working to make copies of a TMAP street map of the area near the convention hotel available, including the French Quarter. Make sure to pick up one of those maps.

Going somewhere else on vacation this summer? No problem! You can purchase TMAP tactile street maps and other unique MAD Lab products at the Adaptations Store. Visit www.adaptations.org or call 888-400-8933 for more information.For inquiries or questions for the MAD Lab, please contact madlab@lighthouse-sf.org or visit the MAD Lab page on the LightHouse website. We look forward to meeting you at this year’s summer conferences.

Sunshine, Bubbles and Bugs! A Garden Party for LightHouse Little Learners

Sunshine, Bubbles and Bugs! A Garden Party for LightHouse Little Learners

By Pam Chapin, LightHouse Little Learners Program Director

On May 9, the LightHouse Little Learners team hosted their first ever Garden Party event for children and their families on the patio of Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley, where LightHouse has its East Bay office. Children poured over tactile and Braille books and delighted in exploring the toddler-sized Braille keyboard and letter sounds of a Braille Buzz by American Printing House.  Expressions of joy and wonderment abounded as children put their hands in a sensory tray filled with dried beans and plastic colorful bugs, to catch with a net, or view with a magnifying glass. Giggles and bubbles floated through the air as children used an accessible switch to play with a bubble frog machine. To engage little ones’ senses, children planted silk flowers into edible soil made of cocoa, flour, and a dash of oil to create a kinetic sand-like texture. Delicious snacks and lemonade-making were also part of the festivities.

Parents enjoyed meeting other families and taking family portraits thanks to the amazing photography skills of Early Childhood Blind and Low Vision Specialist, Emmalaine. Families took home little flower pots their children had planted, balloons and spring baskets. One parent shared afterwards, “I wanted to say how wonderful the garden party was today. The three of us had such a fun time and it was so great to see [our daughter] practicing a little independence. The activities that you all had out for the kids were just perfect.”
 
The LightHouse Little Learners program is designed to help young children, birth to age three, who are blind, DeafBlind, have low vision or a neurological visual impairment, or whose developmental delays include blindness or low vision. To find out more, visit the LightHouse Little Learners webpage.